Electrical Engineering Library

IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Association http://www.ieee.org/index.html

NECA – National Electrical Contractors Association http://www.necanet.org


How to Control Electrical Hazards Booklet see U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA http://www.osha.gov/Publications/3075.html

This booklet provides a generic overview of a standards-related topic. This publication does not alter or determine compliance responsibilities, which are described in the OSHA standards and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Because interpretations and enforcement policy may change over time, the best sources for additional guidance on OSHA compliance requirements are current administrative interpretations and decisions by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission and the courts. This publication is in the public domain and may be reproduced fully or partially without permission.
U.S. Department of Labor, Elaine L. Chao, Secretary
Occupational Safety and Health Administration, John L. Henshaw, Assistant Secretary OSHA 3075 2002 (Revised)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION TOPICS (OSHA)

Electrical Topics: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/electrical/index.html
This section highlights OSHA standards, the Regulatory Agenda (a list of actions being taken with regard to OSHA standards), Federal Registers (rules, proposed rules, and notices), directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to electrical hazards.

Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution Industry http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/powergeneration/index.html
This page is a part of OSHA’s commitment to provide employers and workers in the electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industry with information and assistance to help them comply with OSHA standards and ensure a safe workplace.   The included standards, were the most frequently cited by Federal OSHA during October 2008 through September 2009, in Electric Services Industry Group (SIC code 491).

OSHA Assistance for the Electrical Contractors Industry http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/electricalcontractors/index.html
Electrical contractors are responsible for the health and safety of employees who are exposed to a variety of hazards.   This link is maintained as a product of the Alliance between OSHA and the Independent Electrical Contractors, Inc. (IEC).
Electrical hazards are addressed in specific standards for recordkeeping, the general industry, shipyard employment, marine terminals, and the construction industry. Standards: This link highlights OSHA standards, the Regulatory Agenda (a list of actions being taken with regard to OSHA standards), directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to the electrical contractors industry.

OSHA – Control of Hazardous Energy

Lockout/Tagout or LOTO as it is more commonly referred to, is a collection of specific practices and procedures primarily designed to safeguard employees from unforeseen and unexpected incidents such as the abrupt and unexpected start of machines and equipment or the release of hazardour energy during service or maintenance activities.

This makes LOTO an extremely useful and essential component of day to day work for certain industries. Approximately 3 million workers stand to be at risk if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. By complying with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries are prevented each year. Exposure to hazardous material can be fatal. Workers who are injured on the job due to exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 work days while healing and recuperating from their injuries; their health lingering from severe to critical throughout that phase depending on the extent of injuries. In a recent study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities occurred between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically the absence of LOTO protocol. LOTO is now regarded as the industry standard for many industries including construction.

The links below highlight OSHA standards, rules, directives, regulations as well as interpretations of the standards pertaining to LOTO.

US DOL/OSHA Citations

US-Department-of-Labors-OSHA-cites-The-Home-Depot-for-exposing-workers-to-electrical-hazards
Pandrol USA LP, manufacturer cited by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
ATW Citation $63,000 proposed penalties.
Cargill Meat Solutions $114,000 Penalties.
St. Cloud Veterans Affairs Health Care System Fabricator Fine
Interstate Electrical Services Contractor Citation
Fontarome Chemical Company Citation
Cives Steel Fabricator Fines